Bricks & Minifigs is that one-stop aftermarket LEGO store in the Central Valley.

“We’re the largest toy store of our kind, specializing in new and used LEGO items,” said Matt Montalvo, who is the store manager at the Manteca business located at 1140 N. Main St.

Bricks & Minifigs’ principle is built on the three Rs – Rebuild, Reuse and Reimagine.

Rebuild calls for using the thousands of pieces for those of any age to recapture that childhood moment.

Reuse is buying, selling and trading anything LEGO brand for top dollars.

And Reimagine is creating that masterpiece using both new and used sets.

Simply put, there’s no age limit when it comes to LEGO building blocks.

VINCE REMBULAT/209 Business Journal
Thousands of loose building blocks can be found at the one-stop aftermarket LEGO store.

“I don’t think you ever outgrow them,” said Montalvo, who looks no further than his father-in-law Jason Messer.

He’s the former Superintendent of the Manteca Unified School District. Messer took over the Bricks & Minifigs LEGO store in Concord not long after resigning from his post of 10 years back in 2018. Later that fall, he opened the second store in Manteca, having learned the ins and outs of buying, selling, and trading side of the business.

Montalvo, who is married to Messer’s daughter Kailin, became the operator of the Manteca store, which officially opened November 2018.

Much has changed since then. In particular, the COVID-19 pandemic.

Bricks & Minifigs adapted to the safety protocols, using curbside services during one of the shutdown periods for those purchasing items online.

“That was a big part of our business,” Montalvo recalled.

Since the start of the pandemic, Bricks & Minifigs experienced a better second year of operation. Montalvo and others believe the reason for that has been the stay-at-home hobby enthusiasts – regardless of age.

The creativity of a LEGO building set can serve as a good stress-relief outlet. Messer, for one, showed off his creative side in building a reinforced LEGO throne – as supported by a wood-structured frame – in front of Gamer’s Path connecting entry way.

The family also owns that store, having purchased the business from the previous owner last year and relocating it to the former party room of Bricks & Minifigs.  

On the educational side, Bricks & Minifigs partnered with MUSD’s MEL (Manufacturing Engineering Learning through STEM) Garage by providing the LEGO build-your-own ball mazes and the pullback LEGO race cars.

Montalvo has seen parents come in with their children to pick up loose LEGO bricks to construct their California Mission project as required for those in fourth grade.

Furthermore, he mentioned that creative ideas with LEGO building blocks via YouTube – see: Top 10 Building ideas Anyone Can Make or LEGO Life Hacks – have attracted more enthusiasts to the store.

Information: got to  www.brickandminifigs.com or call (209) 624-3462.